Individual Research

Hair Accessory – Joy

 Kanzashi are hair ornaments used in traditional Japanese hairstyles.
 
Mariko Mori

Inspired by the world of Mariko Mori and the way she transforms traditional forms into contemporary and even futuristic renditions. Once having described her aim to “connect [ancient things] with contemporary life through the technology we have now”, Mori implements aural layering and digital imaging to splice epochs of Asian belief systems.

Smart Hair Clips: First Sign Hair Clip

First Sign Technologies is unveiling a smart hair pin with automatic security system that alerts authorities when the wearer is under assault or in trouble. This technology is interesting as it goes beyond the properties of just hardware. You could see this smart hair clip in many different scenarios where women are exercising alone, while travelling or driving alone, for elderly parents or anytime one might feel unsafe in a specific environment.

The First Sign Hair Clip, measuring 12 x 40 x 4 mm (0.5 x 1.75 x 0.15 in), looks like any other typical hair clip but do not be deceived by its looks. This nondescript hair pin is laden with a gyroscope, 3-axis accelerometer, Bluetooth, microphone, manual alarm trigger, micro-USB charger and a lithium-polymer battery, which together may someday protect your life against a violent crime.

Nuviun, 2014, ‘A Smart Hair Clip with Impact Sensors and Security Alert System Helps Women Fight Violent Crime,’ 12 March, <http://nuviun.com/content/This-Smart-Hair-Clip-with-Impact-Sensors-and-Security-Alert-System-Helps-Women-Fight-Violent-Crime&gt;.

Su-Jeong Mask 1.0: Speculative Design Example

Su Jeong Mask 1.0


Intelligent Pills – Wiana

Limitless

Limitless_TV_series

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An author from New York City suffers from writer’s block and discovers a new drug called the smart pill that is able to enhance his intelligence at a superhuman rate. The pill enables him to utilise the full percentage of his brain to learn, analyse and recall memories from his distant past. This inspired our idea of establishing a pill to perform these superhuman actions, mainly for patients who suffer memory loss.

Limitless 2011, motion Picture, Relativity Media, USA


Headpiece – Sarah

LumaHelm

LumaHelm can also visualize heart rate to make other (road) users aware that the helmet wearer is a fragile human being and makes visible to others that the wearer invests physical effort. Increased physical effort can lead to decreased attention, hence the LumaHelm makes visible that cyclists might not be in the same bodily state as their fellow road users such as car drivers, hopefully contributing to a better understanding of each other’s different needs, furthering the appreciation of each other.

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Neural Helmet Prototype is inspired by the visualisation of internal activities inside the body using LED lights.

Metcalfe J. 2012, “This Is Not an Interrogation Device, Just a Super-Safe Bike Helmet”, weblog, The Atlantic, viewed 21st October 2015, <http://www.citylab.com/tech/2012/06/not-interrogation-device-just-super-safe-bike-helmet/2373/ >.


Conductive Body Paint

As our lifes are increasingly regulated by electronics and there is a drive towards the miniaturization and portability of electronics on and around the body it seems only logical to place electronic circuits on the surface of body.

How about a conductive ink that is applied directly onto the skin to bridge the gap between electronics and the body. The material allows users to create custom electronics and interact with technology through intuitive gesture. It also allows information to be sent on the surface of the skin from person to person or person to object.

The formulation is carbon based and water-soluble: skin-safe and non-invasive. It may be applied in a number of ways including brushing on, stamping or spraying and has future potential for use with conventional printing processes on the body. Potential application areas may be: dance performances, music, fashion, security, military, audio/visual communication and medical devices

Mensvort, K. V., 2009, ‘Conductive bodypaint,’ NextNature, 17 April, viewed 20 October 2014, <https://www.nextnature.net/2009/04/conductive-bodypaint/&gt;.

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